Monday, July 26, 2010

A BERGHAUS KHUMBU CALLED "LA MAGA"... FAR MORE THAN A BACKPACK



Since May 1st, 2005 I carrry on my back far more than a backpack. At times it has been a home, the camuflaged wings of my soul. Technically speaking, La Maga is a Berghaus Khumbu 70, an English-made backpack crafted by the same people who pushed the first internal frame rucsac into the market in 1971. After 7 years of enduring every imaginable condition across 47 countries, five continents and 160,000 kms,  La Maga is still going strong. What follows is a photographic essay, a brief sample of its adventures.

THE ROADS OF THE WORLD




Sahara Desert, on the desolate  road to the Siwa Oasis, Egypt.




Tibet, road 219, pssibly the most isolated and less travelled track on Earth. 2,000 km from Ali to Lhasa, the Tibetan capital.



La Maga likes history: here you can see her over an original, intact Roman road in Syria.



 But she also knows busy, modern European highways. Here in the Netherlands.


Finland: the sign proclaims our goal: "Around the World"




India: cows -or the Gods reincarnated in them- stare at La Maga.



Of course she also feels at home in Argentinean roads. In te picture you can see some of the badges we have incorporated as years passed: Norway, Iran, Siria, Romania, Ecuador and China, all countries where we lived famous adventures.


Ruta 40: 4,667 km of fun from Tierra del Fuego to the Altiplano.


 ....and eventually on April, 10th 2010 La Maga met "El Salmón", Laura's backack. Picture taken in Salta, Argentina.

 


Having some rest in an old Pakistani house at Chitral.



La Maga is planet-friendly. She easily makes friends among local flora and fauna.... Here in the Bolivian Chaco.

2 comments:

Tim Shey said...

I liked the photo of your backpack on that Roman road in Syria.

"My Backpack"
http://www.digihitch.com/article1744.html

"The Things I Carry"

http://www.digihitch.com/article1941.html

allfatherodin said...

So how on EARTH did you get into Tibet? Recently it has become a little obsession of mine, but I was so sad to hear that the Chinese keep strong tabs on the borders.. Though I assume you could hike in?